Joseph Bonnier de la Mosson's cabinet de curiosités, assembled in the 1730s and arranged within several rooms of the collector's Parisian town house, is perhaps the single best-documented eighteenth-century example of its type.1 Its contents and decor were recorded in a series of architectural drawings and sale catalogues, and the hôtel particulier and garden were depicted on the so-called Plan de Turgot of 1739.2 Accordingly, much has been written on the collection by historians of art, architecture, urbanism, science, and technology.3 Yet previous analyses of Bonnier's collections and patronage have not fully considered the visual and conceptual role of the garden planted outside his...

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