The Hellenistic Sanctuary of Hekate at Lagina in Karia (336–331 BCE), north of Rhodes on the southwestern Anatolian mainland, presents scholars with a number of interpretive problems. Architectural cousins of this large, pseudodipteral Corinthian temple are found throughout the Hellenistic world, notably at Anatolian sites such as Magnesia and Alabanda. Several of sanctuary's features, however—the subject matter of its sculpture and the inclusion of a place for sacrifice inside its cella—are found nowhere else in the Greek world. Much of the complex's distinctive nature can be attributed to the cult of the goddess worshipped there. While Hekate was venerated throughout the Greek world, she received personal dedications mainly...

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