Ugliness and Judgment is a short and dense book that argues that the concept of architectural ugliness can be seen as an ingredient of a social conflict with institutional elements rather than as a matter of personal or shared aesthetic taste. In order to establish this argument, Timothy Hyde presents his hypothesis through a series of events in English architecture, because in England there is a continuous history, hundreds of years long, of civil and ecclesiastical courts arbitrating disputes in what would now be called town planning. Indeed, the power of the latter has strengthened in recent years, since the passing of the Ecclesiastical Exemption (Listed Buildings and...

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