During the early years of the twentieth century, many Mexican architects, like their peers in other parts of the world, were determined to produce a modern architecture specific to their nation. This ambition fueled a prolific debate about what constituted Mexican identity. Mexican architects, consequently, set themselves the task of making both a new architecture and a new architectural history. This concern for creating a national architectural history defined their designs throughout the first half of the twentieth century. In Modern Architecture in Mexico City, Kathryn E. O'Rourke draws from this context and argues that the foundations of Mexican modernism are to be found in the first...

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