It is useful to begin this review of Carroll William Westfall's recent defense of the classical tradition as the wellspring of all that is “good, beautiful and true” in architecture by invoking a distinction the ancient Stoics made between truth (alêtheia) and the true (to alêthes). For the Stoics, coherence was the touchstone of truth, and truth was a body, “a collection of several elements consisting in knowledge,” equivalent to a certain degree to reality itself.1 A body, they explained, was not a finger, a toe, an ear, an elbow, or an eye, but all of these together. The true, on the other...

You do not currently have access to this content.