Not long ago, many historians believed that the first great era of German modern architecture ended abruptly with Hitler's rise to power.1 According to this narrative, the demise coincided with the closure of the Bauhaus in 1933 and the subsequent emigration of leading architects such as Walter Gropius and Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, the former in 1934, the latter in 1937. Today, we know that the story is far more complicated. In her 1968 book Architecture and Politics in Germany, 1918–1945, Barbara Miller Lane showed that Nazi views of modernism were more nuanced than was once believed, and that Hitler's cultural policies must be seen...

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