When scholars think of architecture in the Himalayas, what most readily come to mind are the Buddhist monasteries or wooden “pagoda-like” shrines of Tibet, Nepal, and the western Himalayas. Older stone temples are rarely considered, and the central Himalayas are often completely ignored. Unlike the adjacent kingdoms of Kashmir and Chamba or the Kathmandu Valley, the central Himalayas suffer from poor infrastructure that restricts travel, as well as a paucity of textual sources that could contextualize material culture. This is in contrast to the region's vast traditions of pilgrimage, which have been of great interest to anthropologists and scholars of religion. What makes Nachiket Chanchani's new book Mountain...

You do not currently have access to this content.