How do we know what we learn in an architecture or design school? How does visual or other instruction engaging the bodily senses inform the teaching of design as a creative yet iterative, pattern-making process? And what are the epistemological mechanisms that have historically supported such pedagogical practices converting bodily movements, tactile sensations, color tones, and sound signals into painted images, concrete artifacts, and built spaces?

In Kinaesthetic Knowing, Zeynep Çelik Alexander examines the methodical construction of such knowledge by describing the codification of psychological intuitions into a pedagogical system that has perpetuated itself in design schools over several generations. For decades now, modern architecture has been...

You do not currently have access to this content.