“Relationships,” Iris Moon tells us, “are a form of paperwork” (13). In this fascinating book, she asserts that bureaucracy of various kinds underpins our understanding of how the architectural team of Charles Percier and Pierre-François-Léonard Fontaine established their mutual practice, continuing it against the odds through dramatic regime changes in late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century France. More important, however, paper itself—as maddeningly contingent material substrate, as substitute for solid buildings, and as money—emerges here as a determining force. With so many projects unrealized or unrealizable during the French Revolution and Empire, architecture took to the page.

Moon's focus is how interior decoration provided new ways of giving shape...

You do not currently have access to this content.