Though both men worked for Fascist patrons, Ponti's and Terragni's different political attitudes represent varying relationships between architecture and power. Ponti was imbued with bourgeois moderation, politically and culturally, and therefore stood outside the Italian avant-garde. He presented himself in Domus—the journal he founded in 1928—as an architectural reformer, not as a revolutionary. By contrast, from 1928 to 1931, Terragni and his fellows of Gruppo 7 and Movimento Italiano per l'Architettura Razionale (MIAR) campaigned to convince Mussolini that rationalism was the fittest architectural response to the Fascist agenda—that is, to a regime that presented itself as revolutionary, they presented themselves as fellow revolutionaries. Giorgio Ciucci, in his...

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