New architecture and design biennials are proliferating at a rapid pace throughout the world. They seem to be fulfilling needs that are driven by the role of global tourism in urban economies and by a desire among educators, professionals, and general audiences for more inclusive and public discussions about the built environment. The most successful biennials are the ones that connect people who have innovative ideas with those who have the resources to implement them.

I write as an architectural educator and historian (and occasional critic) who trained in Venice (where the world's first architectural biennial was officially launched in 1980 under the directorship of Italian architect and...

You do not currently have access to this content.