Over the past decades, art and architectural historians have shown ever-increasing interest in how users of monuments and cities have historically experienced these spaces sensually. Especially for premodern contexts, this is a challenging endeavor: first-person accounts are virtually absent, and scholars are often limited to textual sources that need to be mined and read against the grain. Many sensory studies in architectural history focus on sound, eschewing other sensory modalities and ways in which sound, sight, smell, touch, and taste interlink. This focus can be explained by the availability of technological aids such as acoustic modeling software for reconstructing historical soundscapes and geographic information systems for creating sound...

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