It is difficult to overstate the tremendous impact of Edward Said's Orientalism on the various fields of the humanities in Western academia.1 Said's wide-ranging, profound, and multidisciplinary critique of the ways in which the triumphant culture of our times, the Western one from the Enlightenment to the present, has encountered, codified, and represented the culture of its most immediate other, the Islamic Orient, opened the door for all repressed cultures to question their received representation and to deconstruct the discourse that produced it over time.2 This has led to the revolution in the humanities that we identify today as postcolonial criticism, a revolution that was a...

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