Few historical investigations have accomplished the dual task of writing the history of a significant postmodern architectural moment while simultaneously unpacking its defining theoretical concepts. Maybe that historical period is still too close to our own. Or perhaps documenting an ouroboric movement such as postmodernism, one that centered on history and the revival of architectural styles, is itself the problem.

Among the first books to confront the history of postmodern architecture were Reinhold Martin's Utopia's Ghost, Michael Hays's Architecture's Desire, and Emmanuel Petit's Irony; or, The Self-Critical Opacity of Postmodern Architecture.1 These, however, were more concerned with revisiting themes of postmodern theory than with...

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