Until recently, critical discussions of Viennese modernism have centered primarily on the fin de siècle. Major themes have included the Wagner school, the Secessionist movement, the Wiener Werkstätte, and the rejection or remaking of ornament and symbol. By contrast, Christopher Long's The New Space: Movement and Experience in Viennese Modern Architecture offers a fresh perspective by looking closely into spatial experiments within Viennese modernism from around 1910, with the waning of the Jugendstil, until 1938, when Hitler and the Nazis annexed Austria. Long traces the evolving ideas about space articulated in the writings and buildings of three Viennese architects—Oskar Strnad, Adolf Loos, and Josef Frank—and highlights their shared...

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