The life and work of the English architect Cedric Price (1934–2003) remain something of an enigma in the history of postwar architectural culture in Britain and abroad. Although few of Price's projects were ever built, the enduring influence of his ideas and design philosophy has secured him a unique cult status as a radical architect and intellectual who persistently questioned architecture's role in society and the limits of his profession. He is most often celebrated for his seminal work of the 1960s, frequently with reference to his two most “iconic” projects, the Fun Palace and the Potteries Thinkbelt, but the wider scope of Price's oeuvre—which spans more than...

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