Taking up themes and methods often associated with Islamic art history and applying them to the contemporary era, Kishwar Rizvi's The Transnational Mosque serves as a timely reminder of the multifaceted and complex outcomes of modernity and its ever-changing relationship with history. Through well-researched and detailed analyses of major mosque projects that have altered cityscapes from Rome to Lahore, Rizvi examines how transnational interests have used architecture in the service of political Islam, transnational capital, and international dominance. Recognizing contemporary religious architecture not simply as retrograde or populist reprisal of historical styles, she identifies how architecture continues to serve its function of articulating public policy through mass expenditure...

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