The French Hungarian architect Yona Friedman has suffered an odd historiographical fate. He is known, to quote Archigram's Peter Cook, as a “Daddy of the megastructure” and a leader of an international network of experimental urbanists in the 1960s and 1970s.1 He is acknowledged as a pioneer in the theorization of key design concepts such as mobility, adaptability, and improvisation, and he is lauded as an influential progenitor of participatory design. But these plaudits appear mostly in footnotes, interviews, blog posts, and passing asides. Friedman remains an “architect's architect,” receiving scant attention from historians. The recent retrospective Yona Friedman: Architecture mobile = Architecture vivante, held at the Cité de l'Architecture et du Patrimoine in Paris, attempted to rectify this state of affairs and introduce Friedman to a broader audience.

Curated by Caroline Cros, the show glossed Friedman's biography and his major projects. Filling one large gallery, it was...

You do not currently have access to this content.