In 1936, the leading British journal Architectural Review reconsidered its medium and its message by punching holes out of one of its thick interior sheets, displaying round sections of an image on the following page, to readers’ delight. Playfully revealing and concealing, and connecting word, image, and magazine design for a 1930s audience, these well-placed holes reminded readers that even a robust and established critical voice could have a little fun. Mavericks: Breaking the Mould of British Architecture, at the Royal Academy, was also shaped by the spirited circle. The cover of its catalogue used the same circular trick as the 1930s AR issue. It was, too,...

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