Commenced in the 1070s and consecrated in 1211, the Romanesque cathedral of Santiago de Compostela furnished the Galician shrine of Saint James the apostle with a building in the forefront of European experiments with structural engineering, architectural design, and programmatic sculptural decoration, suiting the shrine's preeminence as a pilgrimage center. English-speaking medievalists and architectural historians will be familiar with the great architectural and sculptural campaigns under Bishop Diego Gelmírez (1100–1140), Master Mateo's late twelfth-century west porch (Pórtico de la Gloria), Kenneth Conant's monograph, and his notion of the “pilgrimage church,” which associates Compostela with churches of similar design at Tours, Limoges, Conques, and Toulouse.1 

En el principio...

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