In recent years, the global perspective has gained ground in the humanities, challenging the prominence of Eurocentric histories and creating a demand for non-Western content to enter, populate, and reform previous normative narratives. Mark Jarzombek and Vikramaditya Prakash's pioneering 2007 textbook A Global History of Architecture, with drawings by Francis Ching, made possible new fields of historical interrogation and foregrounded previously marginal histories of architectural production.1 Universities and other educational institutions have since embraced the call for a more inclusive architectural history, issuing new curriculum requirements and offering funding opportunities for research that expands beyond what is known and documented about the Anglo-Saxon world. The new mandate for world cultures courses published...

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