This journal was founded seventy-four years ago with the ambition of launching a “new” architectural history and expanding the scope of the discipline. While the readership expanded in the next three decades, the confines of the field became increasingly narrow in the 1950s and 1960s. This was the subject of John Maass’s 1969 article that demonstrated the near absence of “non-Western” and “vernacular” topics in JSAH.1 This was followed a year later by Sibyl Moholy-Nagy’s acerbic criticism of the journal for promoting disciplinary obsolescence.2 Despite these consecutive depth charges that shattered SAH’s carapace of disciplinary ecumenism, both the society and the journal sailed seemingly untroubled into the next millennium.

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