Scholars have subjected postwar responses to the Holocaust in visual arts, memorials, and museums to much debate, particularly since the rapid expansion of the construction of monuments in North America and Europe beginning in the 1980s. Architectural historians have focused on key works such as the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum as well as on canonical figures within contemporary practice who engage the topic, such as Peter Eisenman and Stanley Tigerman. In general, the books published to date have isolated specific sites or individuals. They have not systematically asked whether there is something common about responses in the built environment to the Jewish genocide—that is, whether there are stylistic or conceptual trends and patterns...

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