Most architectural histories of the twentieth century recognize Kenzō Tange (1913–2005) as a key figure bridging Japan and the rest of the world in the years following World War II. Yet Tange remains significant worldwide today because of the inventive ways he harnessed the tension between local tradition and modern-day technology. This elegantly concise monograph offers a fresh glimpse of the complexities of the Japanese milieu in which he practiced, showing how beyond the concrete megastructures invariably associated with his name in the 1960s, Tange’s oeuvre encompassed regional planning, urban design, buildings of various sizes, stage sets, furniture, and photography. Exposing these multiple facets of his creativity, the volume focuses on the first two...

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