The garden city movement is almost synonymous with modern planning history, and it has attracted a sizable literature documenting and examining its many environmental, social, and design implications.1 The late Peter Hall cast the garden city as “the most important response to the Victorian city,” noting that it “reverberated around much of the world” and in so doing acquired guises “that made it sometimes well-nigh unrecognizable.”2 The most prolific manifestation—the antithesis of Ebenezer Howard’s initial aspirations toward a new urban system of community-controlled decentralized self-contained towns—was the garden suburb. Paradise Planned aims to be the definitive “comprehensive monographic treatment of the garden suburb” in all its variegated forms in order to demonstrate...

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