In 1932 the artist Paul Nash observed, “Whether it is possible to ‘Go Modern’ and ‘Be British’ is a question vexing quite a few people to-day.”1 Foreign influences such as the 1927 English translation of Le Corbusier’s Vers une architecture and a stream of architects from continental Europe as well as other parts of the world raised the question of how to align modernism, and the internationalism it suggested, with a desire to preserve what was valuable about Britain. Scholars of modern British architectural history have ably examined the topic of how the nation has maintained recognizable markers of British identity while embracing the ideas, arguments, and architects associated with the modern movement....

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