Since the nineteenth century, historians and theoreticians of architecture have tended to examine the baroque in those moments when the relationship between the production of architecture and its historical analysis, between doing architecture and doing history, has been open to contention.1 Generation after generation, scholars have been prompted to pay attention to the baroque to consider the limits of architectural history as a field and to advance new propositions concerning the relation of contemporary architectural practice and thought to its past.

Architects and historians who addressed the baroque as a subject of history helped to shape debates around modern expressionism and functionalism. The baroque shored up both phenomenological and critical sides of the...

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