Generations of Venetian scholars will recall Juergen Schulz, who died on 23 November 2014, as the distinguished figure at the desk by the window in the reading room of the city’s State Archives.1 He arrived early to secure that place, and he worked through the day from his knees, a posture forced on him by the pain in his back that he would not let compromise his research. They will also remember him as the colleague who led study tours through the outback of the city to see the often obscure traces of its early urban fabric. “Venice,” he’d say, in the argot of a 1950s radio detective, “is my beat.” These are...

You do not currently have access to this content.