The conceit of the Global South as a discursive social geography pervades questions of how and where to begin writing a history of architecture that is connective rather than autonomous in its outlook. From its antecedents in the 1950s and 1960s economic modeling of a “third world,” the term Global South has assumed the mantle of an expansive yet ill-defined arena in which the circulation of ideas concerning statehood, or at least self-determination, is at odds with the power structures that inform those ideas. Today we might understand the Global South as a concept that embodies the overlooked, the marginalized, and the contemptuous desires of governments to forestall equanimity in and of space.

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