The life and career of architect Victor Alfred Lundy (b. 1923) have been long and varied. Born in New York City to Russian immigrants, Lundy studied architecture at New York University before World War II and with Bauhaus founder Walter Gropius at Harvard’s Graduate School of Design after the war. His first buildings are considered part of the so-called Sarasota school, although their soaring, scooping, and generally curvaceous forms were far more expressionistic than those designed by Lundy’s fellow Harvard and Sarasota school colleague Paul Rudolph (1918–97). After Sarasota, Lundy moved back to New York and established a practice that produced everything from a church in East Harlem to an IBM headquarters in New...

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