It is always a matter for celebration when the Victoria and Albert Museum brings architecture out of its small, dedicated display area on the upper floors and places it center stage in the main exhibition halls. The tercentenary of the Hanoverian accession has stimulated public and media engagement with all things Georgian, and this interest, in combination with American funding, meant that hopes were high that this exhibition might do for eighteenth-century architecture what the Pugin and Morris shows of the early 1990s did for nineteenth-century visual culture, or what the more recent high-profile “isms” exhibitions on art nouveau, modernism, and the like have done for the public profile and understanding of twentieth-century design....

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