Georges Teyssot’s A Topology of Everyday Constellations is a genealogy of domestic space in its many guises, from the bourgeois sitting room of nineteenth-century Paris to the phenomenal Umwelten of today’s smartphone-carrying, networked subjects. The book situates itself firmly within the context of many other studies of (architectural, artistic, cultural) modernity that stress that historical period as a time of radical reversals—of object and subject, of center and periphery, of interior and exterior. Teyssot, however, does not see these binaries as being in strict opposition. Rather, he understands them as moving points along the twisting surfaces of discourses, design objects, and lived experience itself. Thus he adopts the role of what Peter Sloterdijk has...

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