The Studio d’Architettura Civile, published in three volumes by Domenico de’ Rossi (Rome, 1702–21), is one of the most beautifully produced architecture books of its time. It also constituted an essential reference and source of inspiration for patrons, architects, and amateurs in eighteenth-century Europe as well as comprising a powerful instrument of the promotion of Roman baroque aesthetics and vocabulary. De’ Rossi’s Studio—a facsimile of which was published in 1972—contains 287 folio plates organized into three volumes according to three thematic areas: doors and windows; chapels, altars, and tombs; and plans, elevations, and cross sections of both sacred and secular buildings.1 Roman buildings largely dominate the plates of the Studio, but some Florentine and Neapolitan examples are also included. As for architects, Michelangelo, Borromini, and Bernini are the best represented, but much space is also dedicated to later generations, including Camillo Arcucci, Giovanni Antonio de’ Rossi,...

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