In 1383 the Troyes cathedral chapter paid Henry de Bruisselles 20 sous “for a portrait for the … choir screen made on parchment … to show to the bourgeois and to the laborers of the city side by side with another portrait made by Michelin, the mason. The said bourgeois and laborers held that the portrait of Henry de Bruisselles was the better.”1

At about the same time, Peter Parler or his son, Wenzel, designed the upper stories of Prague cathedral’s south transept, revising a drawing begun three decades earlier. The same drawing, taken to Vienna by Wenzel, informed his work on the south tower of the Stephansdom. Drawings on parchment, complemented by wood or paper templates, small sketches, and full-scale engravings on walls and pavements, embody one intricate facet of the robust technology of architectural representation. Vehicles of communication, construction guides, and instruments of public persuasion, they informed...

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