When we think of the archive, we think of a familiar space of restricted access, white gloves, pencils, and carefully delimited rules. But if we think of an archive as a collection of important primary sources, made available for researchers to use, it becomes clear that there are other kinds of archives that may exist virtually as much as physically. With both architecture and writing produced digitally today, the archive of the future may be a very different sort of place indeed. The first of this issue’s multimedia reviews, by Sean Dockray, looks at UbuWeb, a noted online archive of avant-garde media. In posting such material to the web without express permission, UbuWeb raises questions of fair use as well as of the translation of media. How does a video, an electronic poem for 425 speakers, or a work of concrete poetry make the transition to the generic form of...

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