The notion of a unified, politically integrated, Western hemisphere, removed from the corruptions and agitations of the Old World, has haunted the American imagination since the early nineteenth century. Simultaneously an idealistic dream, a diplomatic tool, an ideological vehicle, and an economic engine, the Pan-American idea has, along with many other constructs, endured cyclical phases and weathered stale interpretations, waxing and waning along with the policy needs of its dominant enforcer, the United States. Occasionally a subject for historians of politics, international relations, and cultural diplomacy, it has served historians of art and architecture only rarely.

Robert Alexander Gonzalez addresses this deficit by exploring what this protean notion has meant for architects and designers...

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