Drawn from the Museum of Modern Art's holdings in design, art, and film, Counter Space highlights the 1926–27 Frankfurt Kitchen, designed for the large public housing projects of that German city. While the curator Juliet Kinchin and curatorial assistant Aidan O'Connor claim in the wall text to explore "the twentieth-century transformation of the kitchen as a barometer of changing technologies, aesthetics, and ideologies," the exhibit offers surprisingly little political analysis of gender stereotypes and the domestic workplace. It recapitulates dominant ideas about woman's proper place—at home working in the "efficient" private kitchen—without the context of feminist critiques and collective alternatives created over the last century and a half. The curators emphasize design and technology in a crowded exhibit divided into four parts: "Toward the Modern Kitchen," "The New Kitchen," "Visions of Plenty," and "Kitchen Sink Dramas."

Kitchen design was the subject...

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