Despite the wine industry's dramatic modernization in the later twentieth century, scholarly research on its architecture and cultural landscapes has lagged, while a plethora of coffee-table books document the increased prominence of architecture in the contemporary wine industry.1 A 2010 exhibition at San Francisco's Museum of Modern Art, curated by SFMOMA's Henry Urbach in collaboration with the architecture firm Diller, Scofidio + Renfro, claimed to be the first exploration of the architecture and design culture of this modern wine industry.

The exhibit did provide an innovative, well-designed, and engaging presentation. Yet the exhibition's title, How Wine Became Modern: Design + Wine 1976 to Now, implied that its subject would be the process by which wine industry and its design culture were modernized—and how modernity happened was exactly what was missing from this exhibit. Both serious oenophiles and architectural students...

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