These two books devoted to the ancient art of building differ in aim and scope. G. R. H. Wright's book follows upon his two earlier volumes, focusing respectively on the historical context and building materials in the ancient world.1 Wright presents this third volume as a compendium of research on ancient construction, intended as a reference for specialists, particularly during fieldwork. Although Carmelo Malacrino's book also addresses scholars, it seeks a wider audience of nonspecialists, and will appeal to classical archaeologists, historians of art and architecture, and the general public with an interest in antiquity. While narrower in terms of the technical specialization of its intended audience, Wright's book features greater breadth in its balance of classical and nonclassical material. Including extensive treatment of the architecture of Egypt, Mesopotamia, Anatolia, the Levant, and Iran, it stretches chronologically from the Neolithic...

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