Between 7000 and 1100 BC the island of Crete produced one of the most idiosyncratic and highly distinctive forms of architecture in the ancient world. There has long been a need for a fresh synthesis of Minoan architecture, one that goes well beyond available studies of materials and techniques, diachronic changes in style, function, sterile modules, or the relationship between architectural and social units. While these topics are well summarized by John McEnroe, the primary goal of this new book is, in the words of the author, "to provide the first overall history of Minoan houses, Palaces, tombs, and towns from the Neolithic period through L[ate] M[inoan] IIIC" (vii). Why "Palaces" appears in upper case and all else in lower case is unclear here, but explained later on. Although McEnroe deftly deals with many aspects treated in earlier studies, it is...

You do not currently have access to this content.