It is hard to believe that there was once a time when the decorated interior hovered at the margins of architectural history. Interiors are now the subject of such widespread and innovative scholarly attention that one can easily forget how undertheorized they used to be, and particularly how infrequently domestic interiors appeared in histories of the built environment. Recent decades have witnessed what could be called the "rise of the interior" within the study of architecture, a disciplinary shift that has significant implications for the eighteenth century. That era's architects and patrons devoted extraordinary attention to the design and outfitting of interiors, and it could be argued that the interior broadly understood became a metaphor for new cultural practices and new sensibilities. This is the implication of Denise Amy Baxter and Meredith Martin's vivid and stimulating collection of essays on eighteenth-century...

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