Urban historian Patrice Elizabeth Olsen's recent book is a thoroughly researched examination of political history in relation to architecture in Mexico City during successive post-Revolutionary presidential administrations from 1920 to 1940. The author's premise “is that significant cultural and political agendas of the Mexican Revolution can be made intelligible through an understanding of works of architecture built in the formative years 1920–1940—the artifacts of the Revolution in Mexico City. This architecture provides us with a means of tracing and understanding the path of the consolidation of the Mexican Revolution, constituting indelible evidence of the process by which that revolution evolved into government” (xi). With this in mind, Olsen explores the intertwining of post-Revolutionary architecture and politics in the capital, using presidential terms, political agendas and upheavals, and significant works of architecture as points of demarcation.

Olsen's preface contextualizes the book and...

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