Felipe Hernández's handsomely illustrated survey presents a timely overview of architectural production in Latin America during the past decade. Hernández positions his book as a critique of much of the existing literature on Latin American architecture. This, he argues, continues to focus reductively on the period between 1929 and 1960, and on the work of such internationally renowned “masters” as Mexico's Luis Barragán (1902–1988), Brazil's Oscar Niemeyer (b. 1907), or Venezuela's Carlos Raúl Villanueva (1900–1975). The “golden age” these men represent was defined by the combination of economic efflorescence and the embrace of modern architecture by several Latin American states as central to their nation-building efforts.

Hernández demonstrates that the panorama of architectural production in Latin America is now significantly different. While renowned architects based in this vast region build, teach, and receive awards around the world, a privilege reserved for...

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