In 1978 the Architectural League of New York opened a small exhibition about a then-obscure Soviet architect, Ivan Il’ič Leonidov. Two decades later, in 2002, Rem Koolhaas declared in Moscow, at the celebration of Leonidov's 100th anniversary, “If the entire twentieth-century architecture of the world was destroyed, it could be brought back to life through the genetic code of Leonidov's architecture” (117). Koolhaas also suggested that Leonidov's three idiosyncratic ceramic, glass, and steel towers for the 1934 NARKOMTJAŽPROM competition be raised at New York's Ground Zero. What is certain is that his discovery of Leonidov's architecture in 1971 at the exhibition Art and Revolution, organized by Oleg Švidkovskij at the Hayward Gallery in London, was the catalyst that propelled the Dutch architect to abandon his career as a filmmaker in order to become one of the most important architects of...

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