Discussion of the Byzantine icon almost invariably focuses on images of sacred persons as intermediaries for communication with the divine. Architecture as Icon challenges this notion to ask how architectural representations-in contrast to figural representations-function in the Byzantine and Orthodox East. This ambitious exhibit brings together seventy-six objects in a variety of media from a vast territory (thirty-four separate collections from eleven countries) and spanning a broad chronology (fourth through nineteenth centuries) that represent architecture or that include images of architecture within their visual fields. The exhibit was co-organized by the Princeton University Art Museum and the European Center for Byzantine and Post-Byzantine Monuments in Thessaloniki, Greece, curated by Slobodan Ćurčić of Princeton, and formulated in collaboration with Evangelia Hadjitryphonos of Thessaloniki. An earlier iteration of the exhibit appeared at the Museum of Byzantine Culture in Thessaloniki.

The exhibit suggests that...

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