Walls of Algiers makes a timely and challenging contribution to debates about French colonial photography, colonial urbanism, and their legacies. Certitude and strident critique of the colonial archive is dislodged in Walls of Algiers by a series of potent questions that look to the historical record as a focus for critique and a resource. Framing their project in such terms, Zeynep ÇÇelik, Julia Clancy-Smith, and Frances Terpak ask: "If architecture is left as primary evidence, how does the historian read and interpret it, dissociating it from the meanings given by colonial representations, yet capitalizing upon them? How do we break free from the guided or supervised receptions imposed by colonial image making in order to perceive other social facts and realities? How can the erasures in text or image be recovered and interpreted historically?"1 Through this exhibition's curatorial strategy and...

You do not currently have access to this content.