Hardly a decade goes by without the publication of a host of new studies on Véézelay. The abbey's nave, the figurative capitals, and its famous portals continue to fascinate the scholarly world. It is perhaps not surprising that, until now, the Gothic choir has been left out. While the nave and the sculptures are recognized as outstanding examples of Romanesque art, the choir is difficult to categorize and escapes easy assessment. Francis Salet, for example, was torn between criticizing the awkwardness of the design and acknowledging its uncommon beauty. Robert Branner highlighted its role in the region "as a turning point toward a fully Gothic style." Louis Grodecki hailed it as a masterpiece of regional Gothic and Bruno Klein praised its subtlety. But, at the same time, the choir could not shake off its reputation as a late and provincial version...

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