Until now, Claude Bragdon (1866––1946) has received little attention from architectural historians. Some are aware of his writings on Louis Sullivan (Bragdon wrote the foreword to Sullivan's The Autobiography of an Idea, 1924), while others have seen illustrations of his exotic crystalline ornament. Bragdon was a prolific writer, a frequent contributor to architectural journals, and the author of numerous books exploring diverse topics from the fourth dimension to yoga. His most accomplished building was the now-demolished New York Central Railroad Terminal (1909––13) in Rochester, New York, with its arcuated faççade and evocative ornament. In this meticulously researched monograph, Jonathan Massey has done a superior job of examining Bragdon's life and career and arguing that he is an architectural and theoretical figure who warrants much greater attention in histories of modern architecture.

In the mid-twentieth century Bragdon faded into obscurity as...

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