These volumes under review demonstrate the conviction of a majority of Italian architectural historians that among the most valuable contributions they can make to the field are studies based on their first-hand knowledge of buildings and the relevant documents in local and state archives. One might complain that this approach is not theoretical enough, yet many of the major, discipline-changing contributions to Italian Baroque architectural history in the last fifty years——such as Rudolf Wittkower's Art and Architecture in Italy 1600––1750 of 1958——have been based on the sort of archival research and close reading of buildings that are pursued in this ambitious project. These volumes continue this empirical tradition and offer a wealth of new material and interpretation.

The series title, Atlante del Barocco in Italia (Atlas of the Baroque in Italy), carefully distinguishes the aim of the project: a census of...

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