This is obviously an important work in progress. Imposing German enterprises such as this one and Die Kirchen von Siena, emanating from the Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florence,1 tend to encounter large immovable objects such as the cathedral of Siena, which slow the majestic progress of publication. Here it is the cathedral of Rome, San Giovanni in Laterano, which occupies almost the whole volume, with the exception of a densely argued section by Darko Senekovic on San Giovanni in Fonte, the Lateran Baptistery (355––93). The present volume begins not with the Lateran itself but with a section adding to and commenting on the first volume of the corpus, published in 2002, which covered Sant'Adriano to Santa Francesca Romana, and providing additional information on the signatures of Cosmati masons as a supplement to Claussen's Magistri Doctissimi Romani of 1987.2 This information...

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